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New York Folklore Quarterly, Vol. XXIX, No. 4, December 1973

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NEW YORK FOLKLORE QUARTERLY
Vol. XXIX, No. 4, December, 1973

CONTENTS

NOTE: THIS ISSUE IS SOLD OUT. Individual articles may be purchased from this issue for $3 each ($2 each for NYFS members). A PDF of the article can then be e-mailed directly to you. For ordering information, see box below.


Contributors
  242

Unintentional Substitution in Folklore Transmission: A Devolutionary Instance

William M. Clements
242

The St. Lawrence River Skiff and the Folklore of Boats

Richard Lunt
254

The Trickster as Literary Hero: Cecil Brown’s The Life and Loves of Mr. Jiveass Nigger

William H. Wiggins, Jr.
269

The Cognatic-Affinal Paradox in the Egyptian Myth of Osiris: A Critical Application of the Structural Method

William Tulio Divale
287

Washington Irving and New England Witchlore

James W. Clark, Jr.
304

Index for Volume XXIX

Helen A. Fraser
314





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The paradox that the Osiris myth attempts to solve is the contradiction between cognatic and affinal kinship relations. Every man ... is at some time a son, a father, or a brother (cognatic roles), as well as a husband and brother-in-law (affinal roles)...To emphasize the ties of blood means to de-emphasize the ties of marriage and vice versa. The paradox is unescapable since each individual has both cognatic and affinal ties, and the contradiction is also real and thus unresolvable. The myth overcomes this paradox though, according to Levi-Strauss’ thinking, by showing that cognatic and affinal relationships are self-conradictory in similar ways and thus they are identical — and if they are identical, they are not contradictory. (from “The Cognatic-Affinal Paradox in the Egyptian Myth of Osiris: A Critical Application of the Structural Method” by William Tulio Divale)


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