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New York Folklore Quarterly
(1945–1974)

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NY FOLKLORE SOCIETY PUBLICATIONS

New York Folklore Quarterly (1945–1974)

Volume I, No. 1: February, 1945 Sold out.
Volume I, No. 2: May, 1945     Sold out.
Volume I, No. 3: August, 1945     Sold out.
Volume I, No. 4: November, 1945     Sold out.

Volume II, No. 1: February, 1946     Sold out.
Volume II, No. 2: May, 1946     Sold out.
Volume II, No. 3: August, 1946     Sold out.
Volume II, No. 4: November, 1946

Volume III, No. 1: Spring, 1947    Sold out.
Volume III, No. 2: Summer, 1947    Sold out.
Volume III, No. 3: Autumn, 1947    Sold out.
Volume III, No. 4: Winter, 1947

Volume IV, No. 1: Spring, 1948    Sold out.
Volume IV, No. 2: Summer, 1948
Volume IV, No. 3: Autumn, 1948
Volume IV, No. 4: Winter, 1948

Volume V, No. 1: Spring, 1949
Volume V, No. 2: Summer, 1949
Volume V, No. 3: Autumn, 1949
Volume V, No. 4: Winter, 1949

Volume VI, No. 1: Spring, 1950
Volume VI, No. 2: Summer, 1950
Volume VI, No. 3: Autumn, 1950
Volume VI, No. 4: Winter, 1950

Volume VII, No. 1: Spring, 1951    Sold out.
Volume VII, No. 2: Summer, 1951
Volume VII, No. 3: Autumn, 1951
Volume VII, No. 4: Winter, 1951

Volume VIII, No. 1: Spring, 1952
Volume VIII, No. 2: Summer, 1952
Volume VIII, No. 3: Autumn, 1952
Volume VIII, No. 4: Winter, 1952

Volume IX, No. 1: Spring, 1953    Sold out.
Volume IX, No. 2: Summer, 1953    Sold out.
Volume IX, No. 3: Autumn, 1953    Sold out.
Volume IX, No. 4: Winter, 1953    Sold out.

Volume X, No. 1: Spring, 1954    Sold out.
Volume X, No. 2: Summer, 1954    Sold out.
Volume X, No. 3: Autumn, 1954    Sold out.
Volume X, No. 4: Winter, 1954

Volume XI, No. 1: Spring, 1955    Sold out.
Volume XI, No. 2: Summer, 1955    Sold out.
Volume XI, No. 3: Autumn, 1955    Sold out.

Volume XII, No. 1: Spring, 1956
Volume XII, No. 2: Summer, 1956
Volume XII, No. 3: Fall, 1956    Sold out.
Volume XII, No. 4: Winter, 1956

Volume XIII, No. 1: Spring, 1957
Volume XIII, No. 2: Summer, 1957
Volume XIII, No. 3: Autumn, 1957
Volume XIII, No. 4: Winter, 1957

Volume XIV, No. 1: Spring, 1958
Volume XIV, No. 2: Summer, 1958
Volume XIV, No. 3: Fall, 1958—Special Issue in honor of Harold W. Thompson
Volume XIV, No. 4: Winter, 1958

Volume XV, No. 1: Spring, 1959—Special Year of History Issue
Volume XV, No. 4: Winter, 1959

Volume XVI, No. 1: Spring, 1960    Sold out.
Volume XVI, No. 2: Summer, 1960    Sold out.
Volume XVI, No. 3: Autumn, 1960
Volume XVI, No. 4: Winter, 1960

Volume XVII, No. 1: Spring, 1961    Sold out.
Volume XVII, No. 2: Summer, 1961
Volume XVII, No. 3: Autumn, 1961 Sold out.
Volume XVII, No. 4: Winter, 1961

Volume XVIII, No. 1: Spring, 1962    Sold out.
Volume XVIII, No. 2: Summer, 1962    Sold out.
Volume XVIII, No. 3: Autumn, 1962    Sold out.
Volume XVIII, No. 4: Winter, 1962    Sold out.

Volume XIX, No. 1: March, 1963    Sold out.
Volume XIX, No. 2: June, 1963
Volume XIX, No. 3: September, 1963    Sold out.
Volume XIX, No. 4: December, 1963    Sold out.

Volume XX, No. 1: March, 1964    Sold out.
Volume XX, No. 2: June, 1964
Volume XX, No. 3: September, 1964
Volume XX, No. 4: December, 1964    Sold out.

Volume XXI, No. 1: March, 1965
Volume XXI, No. 2: June, 1965
Volume XXI, No. 3: September, 1965
Volume XXI, No. 4: December, 1965

Volume XXII, No. 1: March, 1966
Volume XXII, No. 2: June, 1966    Sold out.
Volume XXII, No. 3: September, 1966    Sold out.
Volume XXII, No. 4: December, 1966    Sold out.

Volume XXIII, No. 1: March, 1967    Sold out.
Volume XXIII, No. 2: June, 1967    Sold out.
Volume XXIII, No. 3: September, 1967    Sold out.
Volume XXIII, No. 4: December, 1967    Sold out.

Volume XXIV, No. 1: March, 1968    Sold out.
Volume XXIV, No. 2: June, 1968—The Folk Hero and the National Character    Sold out.
Volume XXIV, No. 3: September, 1968    Sold out.
Volume XXIV, No. 4: December, 1968    Sold out.

Volume XXV, No. 1: March, 1969    Sold out.
Volume XXV, No. 2: June, 1969    Sold out.
Volume XXV, No. 3: September, 1969    Sold out.
Volume XXV, No. 4: December, 1969    Sold out.

Volume XXVI, No. 1: March, 1970    Sold out.
Volume XXVI, No. 2: June, 1970    Sold out.
Volume XXVI, No. 3: September, 1970
Volume XXVI, No. 4: December, 1970    Sold out.

Volume XXVII, No. 1: March, 1971    Sold out.
Volume XXVII, No. 2: June, 1971    Sold out.
Volume XXVII, No. 3: September, 1971    Sold out.
Volume XXVII, No. 4: December, 1971    Sold out.

Volume XXVIII, No. 1: March, 1972    Sold out.
Volume XXVIII, No. 2: June, 1972
Volume XXVIII, No. 3: September, 1972
Volume XXVIII, No. 4: December, 1972

Volume XXIX, No. 1: March, 1973    Sold out.
Volume XXIX, No. 2: June, 1973    Sold out.
Volume XXIX, No. 3: September, 1973    Sold out.
Volume XXIX, No. 4: December, 1973    Sold out.

Volume XXX, No. 1: March, 1974    Sold out.
Volume XXX, No. 2: June, 1974    Sold out.
Volume XXX, No. 3: September, 1974    Sold out.
Volume XXX, No. 4: December, 1974    Sold out.



 



From the New York Folklore Quarterly, Vol. XXX, No. 3, 1974, “The Jersey Devil’s Finest Hour” by Jeremiah J. Sullivan with James F. McCloy:

For about two hundred years now the rural citizens of South Jersey have periodically been terrified by a folk legend known as the Jersey Devil (sometimes called — after its alleged birthplace in Leeds Point, N.J.— The Leeds Devil.) Some writers put the birth of the Jersey Devil in 1735 (as the cursed child of a woman who had said that she would rather bear a devil than another unwanted child), while others say that the creature is the result of a seduction of a Jersey maiden by a British soldier during the American Revolution.

Whatever its origin, the legend took root in the Pine Barrens of South Jersey. where the “Pinies” carried it into the modern area. By the late nineteenth century a whole folklore had grown up about the Jersey Devil. It was said to have bat-like wings, a horse’s head, the body of a dragon, cloven hoots, and a tail. Sometimes it appeared with a beautiful golden-haired girl and at other times with a blood thirsty, headless pirate. It was known to sour milk, wither corn on the stalk, kill fish in the swamps with its foul breath, peer through windows, run along fences, tap on roofs, frighten women and horses, and eat babies.



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