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New York Folklore Vol. 21, Nos. 1-4, 1995
View the Table of Contents here. Back issues of New York Folklore (1975–1999) and single articles are available for purchase.
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NEW YORK FOLKLORE
Vol. XXI, Nos. 1-4, 1995
Proceedings of the Fiftieth Anniversary Fall Conference

CONTENTS

Editor’s Foreword


v

Director’s Foreword
vii

Keynote Addresses
Taking a Breath
Bess Lomax Hawes 1

“It Ought to Be Returned to Them....It Needed to Be Spread Around”: Reflections on Public Folklore Then and Now
Robert Baron 13

Panel
Who Inherits the Tradition?


Robert Bethke, Colleen Cleveland, Nina Jaffe, Tom Porter, Vaughn Ward
39

Folklore in Theory
"A Yorker by Choice, A Folklorist by Persuasion": B. A. Botkin, Public (Folklore) Intellectual
Jerrold Hirsch 75

Making Folklife Theory Public

Debora Kodish
103

History and Regionalism in the Work of John Mason Brewer
John W. Roberts 113

Folklore in Action
Research and Restore: Two Goals, One Society
Bruce Buckley 127

Folklore in New York State: The NYSCA Era

Karen Taussig-Lux and Jessica M. Payne
137

Photograph Album

Photos by Nicole Keys
151

Voices of Tradition
Elsie Edith Cutting
Joyce Ice 155

Interview with Edith Cutting
Melissa Ladenheim 161

Book Reviews
Beck, ed., Vermont Recollections: Sifting Memories Through the Interview Process; Ives, The Tape-Recorded Interview: A Manual for Fieldworkers in Folklore and Oral History

Diane Tye

193

Greenhill, Ethnicity in the Mainstream: Three Studies of English Canadian Culture in Ontario
Peter Narváez 195

Wright, Traveling the High Way Home: Ralph Stanley and the World of Bluegrass Music
Jack Shortlidge 197



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“Botkin advocated an approach that focused on individuals and groups in the context of their community or communities studied over time and paying attention to the way folklore related individuals to each other and to their past and present circumstances. Folklore, viewed historically was not, in Botkin’s opinion the by-product of some dominant impulse of a particular period, but a creative response of individuals and groups using folklore as one of the ways of coping with the challenges of their time and place in the world.” From “ ‘A Yorker by Preference, a Folklorist by Persuasion’: B.A. Botkin, Public (Folklore) Intellectual” by Jerrold Hirsch



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