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New York Folklore Vol. 14. Nos. 3-4, Summer-Fall, 1988
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NEW YORK FOLKLORE
Vol. XIV, Nos. 3-4, 1988
Folk and Traditional Music in New York State
Ray Allen and Nancy Groce, Guest Editors

CONTENTS


Introduction: Folk and Traditional Music in New York State
Ray Allen and Nancy Groce 1

African-American Sacred Quartet Singing in New York City
Ray Allen 7

The Anglo-American Fiddle Tradition in New York State
Simon Bronner 23

Survival of Greek Folk Music in New York

Sotirios (Sam) Chianis
37

Writing While They’re Singing: A Conversation about Longhouse Social Dance Songs

Michael Sam Cronk
49

Traditional Japanese Music in New York State
Linda Fujie 61

Country Dancing in Central and Western New York State
James Kimball 71

Music in New York City’s Chinese Community
Audrey R. Mazur 89

“Our Own Little Isle”: Irish Traditional Music in New York

Rebecca S. Miller

101

From Eastern Europe to East Broadway: Yiddish Music in Old World and New

Henry Sapoznik

117

Italian Music in New York

Michael Schlesinger

129

Puerto Rican Music in New York City

Roberta Singer

139

"Rock the House:" The Aesthetic Dimensions of Rap Music in New York City

Madeline Slovenz

151

Anglo-American Folksong Collecting and Singing Traditions in Rural New York

Vaughn Ramsey Ward

165

Haiti Chérie: Journey of an Immigrant Music in New York City

Lois E. Wilcken

179

Contributors to this Issue, 190; Editor’s Year-End Report, 192.


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“New Englanders coming to New York State in great numbers during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries brought their fiddle-tune tradition with them. In one respect the New Englanders who moved to New York outdid their British cousins. Dancing became even more the rage in New England than in Old. Among the favorite dances were jigs, reels, contra dances, cotillions (forerunner of the square dance), quadrilles, minuets, and hornpipes.” From the “The Anglo-American Fiddle Tradition in New York State,” by Simon J. Bronner.



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