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New York Folklore Vol. 14. Nos. 1-2, Winter-Spring, 1988
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NEW YORK FOLKLORE
Vol. XIV, Nos. 1-2, 1988
Folklore in the Industrial Workplace

CONTENTS

Editor’s Preface iii


Special Section, "Folklore in the Industrial Workplace"

Introduction by the Guest Editor
Mia Boynton 1

Songs of Work and Songs of Worship: Sanctifying Black Unionism in the Southern City of Steel
Brenda McCallum 9

Accident Narratives: Self Protection in the Workplace

Robert McCall
35

Research as an Experiment in Equality
Sandro Portelli 45

The Humor of a Tradition Bearer in the Lumber Yard
Amy F. Skillman 59

Mary Daniels: A Portrait in Steel
Michael Frisch 73

A Woman in a Men’s Sphere: Testimonies from a Woman Steelworker at Buffalo’s Republic Steel

Mia Boynton

87

Afterword

Eileen Basinski

100

Occupational Folklore: Overview and Afterword

Jack Santino

103


Articles



Anthropomorphism in Animal Encylcopedias of 19th Century America


Boria Sax



107



Folklore Notes



The Ballad of Marcus Lyon: The Story Lives On

Melvin G. Williams

123

Emerging Folklore About Acid Rain in the Adirondacks

David S. Turkon

133

Military Folklore: Additional References

Les Cleveland

143

Reviews

Books:
Ward, ed., Personal Places: Perspectives on Informal Art Environments (Benincasa), 147; Dell and Vlach, eds., Common Places: Readings in American Vernacular Architecture (Ward), 149; Bronner, Old Time Music Makers of New York State (Collins), 150; Griffith, Celebrating a Heritage, and Respect and Community: The Arts of Death in a Border Community (Fish), 152; Recordings: Lebentritt and Pearlman, New York City Lullabies (Tucker), 153; Lutz, Up Agin the Mountain: Traditional Ballads and Songs from the Eastern Ramapos (Groce), 154.

Contributors to this Issue, 156.


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“The importance of the unions to black industrial workers in the Birmingham District was expressed through the medium of gospel music, which like some earlier British and American labor song traditions, had a strong ideological commitment to unionism that was grounded in Christian theology and proclaimed unionism as a holy cause.” From the “Songs of Work and Songs of Worship: Sanctifying Black Unionism in the Southern City of Steel,” by Brenda McCallum.



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