NYFS logo    tagline
 Pinto Guira making guiramaking a mandalaplaying mandolin
 


New York Folklore Vol. 18, Nos. 1-4, 2000
View the Table of Contents here. Back issues of New York Folklore (1975–1999) and single articles are available for purchase.
JOIN the New York Folklore Society today to receive Voices.



v18sm1

Support the New York Folklore Society


NEW YORK FOLKLORE
Vol. 18, Nos. 1-4, 2000*
Through African-Centered Prisms
Guest Editor: Barbara L. Hampton
with editorial contributions by
John W. Suter, Karen Taussig-Lux, and Sally Atwater

AN EARLY MODEL FOR THE STUDY OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN FOLKLORE: CARTER G. WOODSON AND THE JOURNAL OF NEGRO HISTORY
by Cassandra A. Stancil

Carter G. Woodson, sometimes called the Father of Black History, is best known for organizing the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History and initiating the celebration of Black History Week in 1926 through the association’s nationwide chapters. What few folklorists realize is that Woodson relied on folklore studies of Africans across the diaspora to carry out his lifelong project—the accurate documentation of African-American historical achievements. Woodson, the historian, demanded studies of folklore from the living communities that produced it and required meaningful interpretations of the values and functions associated with it. Woodson was among the first African-American culture researchers to advocate, promote, and support holistic folklore study with roots grounded in Africa. The pioneering work of this important African-American historian resounds with lessons for modern students of African and African-American folklore.

Born in 1875 to parents who had been slaves, Woodson struggled to acquire an education and eventually earned a doctorate in history from Harvard in 1912, only the second African-American to do so, following W.E.B. DuBois’s lead. In addition to his efforts for the association, Woodson worked on several fronts to accomplish his scholarly goal: “the collection of sociological and historical data on people of African descent.” He established a publishing house (Associated Publishers) to ensure that scholarly works on African-American history would see the light of day. Woodson himself wrote or co-authored at least 15 titles for Associated Publishers (Logan 1940:315). He created the scholarly Journal of Negro History in 1916 as a quarterly publication for original research in African-American history and served as its editor until his death in 1950. Woodson launched the Negro History Bulletin in 1937 for a general readership, and it was issued nine times each year. (Logan 1950:347)....


*This volume was delayed in publication and published out of sequence.

Voices is the membership magazine of the New York Folklore Society. To become a subscriber, join the New York Folklore Society today.


TO PURCHASE A BACK ISSUE of New York Folklore, visit our online book store.


TO PURCHASE THIS ARTICLE from New York Folklore, use the form here.



Right Arrow Image    BACK TO NEW YORK FOLKLORE.

 



New York Folklore
PURCHASE A SINGLE ARTICLE

To order a single article, please enter volume number, issue number, and title of the article you wish and click on an order button below to purchase through Paypal or with your credit card. We will send you a PDF of the article via e-mail upon receipt of your order.

ITEM #603
Single Article $3.00




Volume No. & Issue



Title







Member Price  $2.00



Volume No. & Issue



Title










NEW YORK FOLKLORE SOCIETY ♦ 129 Jay Street ♦ Schenectady, NY 12305 ♦ 518.346.7008 ♦ Fax 518.346.6617 ♦ nyfs@nyfolklore.org