NYFS logo    tagline
 Pinto Guira making guiramaking lacepaper flower making
 

In Harm’s Way
COMMUNITY RESPONSES TO HURRICANE IRENE AND TROPICAL STORM LEE
October 28, 2017 – October 1, 2018
Mabee Farm Historic Site, Rotterdam Junction, NY

PHOTOS FROM THE OPENING

support1

inharmsway
In Harm’s Way
COMMUNITY RESPONSES TO HURRICANE IRENE AND TROPICAL STORM LEE

October 28, 2017 – October 1, 2018
Mabee Farm Historic Site, Rotterdam Junction, NY


A partnership with the New York Folklore Society, this timely exhibition explores local responses to hurricanes, the devastating impact natural disasters have on communities, and the resiliency of our neighbors.
bluebar600

PHOTOS FROM THE OPENING

ihw-exhibit1-550

ihw-exhibit-3-550

inh-exhibit-4-550

ihw-exhibit5-550

ihw-exhibit6-550

ihw-exhibit7

ihw-exhibit8


 
ihw-exhibit2-375
ON LONG ISLAND
“In Harm’s Way” Exhibit

October 6—December 31, 2017
Long Island Museum in Stony Brook


Storms and hurricanes have a long history in upstate New York and Long Island, beginning with the September 1938 “Long Island Express” hurricane. “In Harm’s Way” will explore how local residents and government agencies prepare and recover from natural disasters, in the wake of Superstorm Sandy and Hurricanes Lee and Irene through stories, photographs, objects, and architectural models.

The exhibit examines how individuals and families prepare for severe weather events, how communities protect their coastlines, and how these actions have changed over time. Examples of these actions will include the use of snow fencing to stabilize beaches, home elevations after recent storms including Superstorm Sandy, the creation of sea walls and storm barriers, and the creation of emergency kits to suit specific needs within a family.

Public Programs:

October 6: Exhibit Opening Day

October 28: Symposium 9:45 a.m. –4:00 p.m.

November 12: Learning from our Neighbors 2 p.m.
(see details below)

December 3: Curator’s Gallery Tour 2 p.m.

For information, please visit the LI Museum web site or call (631) 751-0066.



Learning from Our Neighbors
Sunday, November 12 at 2 p.m.
Long Island Museum

On Sunday, November 12 at 2 p.m., the Long Island Museum, in collaboration with Long Island Traditions, presents Learning from our Neighbors, a roundtable discussion, looking back on the five years since Super Storm Sandy and how communities have come together following other historic storms. Nancy Solomon, Director of Long Island Traditions will facilitate a panel discussion with storm survivors from upstate New York, North Carolina, Long Island, and Staten Island on coping and rebuilding after Mother Nature’s wrath. Following the discussion, visitors may visit “In Harm’s Way,” on display in the Art Museum through December 31, 2017.

Panelists include Chuck Tekula of Center Moriches, a long time commercial fisherman; Ernie Foster of North Carolina who has fished the waters off Hatteras professionally for 54 years and is the subject of Hatteras Blues (UNC Press) by Tom Carlson; Adisatu Kabba, a native of Sierra Leone and resident of Staten Island. Adisatu will share her extensive traditional knowledge of storms and hurricanes, both from her native country and more recently during Sandy on Staten Island. Also on the panel is Lillian Spina-Caza, a resident of Schoharie in upstate New York and a survivor of Hurricanes Irene and Lee during 2011, who was instrumental in founding SALT: Schoharie Area Long Term Development. She credits recovery from Hurricane Irene to the number of volunteers working together. Lillian is a professor of communications at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

The discussion will be moderated by Nancy Solomon, Executive Director of Long Island Traditions and curator of “In Harm’s Way;” Dr. Ellen McHale, Executive Director of the New York Folklore Society in Schenectady, NY, and curator of “In Harm’s Way” at the Schenectady Historical Society; Karen Amspacher of Harker’s Island, North Carolina, Executive Director of the Core Sound Waterfowl Museum & Heritage Center founded in 1992; and Naomi Sturm of Staten Island, Director of Public Programs for the Center for Traditional Music and Dance, and curator of “Working Waterfront: Memories Hold,” which examines the Superstorm Sandy experiences and maritime traditions of Staten Island.

ihw-exhibit9-375

NEW YORK FOLKLORE SOCIETY ♦ 129 Jay Street ♦ Schenectady, NY 12305 ♦ 518.346.7008 ♦ Fax 518.346.6617 ♦ nyfs@nyfolklore.org