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AROUND THE STATE

Calendar of Events, Announcements,
& Exhibitions
for New York State


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Around the State Calendar
JAN * FEB * MAR * APR * MAY * JUN * JUL * AUG * SEP * OCT * NOV * DEC

sep2015

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EVENTS by date & deadlines        • ANNOUNCEMENTS         • ONGOING EXHIBITIONS

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Flushing Town Hall presents
Monthly Jazz Jam
7:00 p.m.
Flushing Town Hall, 137-35 Northern Boulevard, (at the corner of Linden Place), Flushing, NY 11354
Tickets: $10/FREE for Performers, Members & Students
Whether you’re a student, jazz musician, or music educator, come join the Queens Jazz OverGround as they lead the house band in this monthly jam session. Held on the first Wednesday of every month, Jazz Jams are a fun way to hone your skills, and jam each month with your peers. Don’t play? Come listen!

September 18–20, 2015
Iroquois Studies Association presents
2015 International Iroquois Beadwork Conference
ALBANY, NEW YORK
Theme: Caroline Parker’s mid-19th-century beadwork
Friday, Sept 18:
        1:00-4:00 p.m. New York State Museum
        7:00-9:00 p.m. Sovereign Best Western Hotel, Western Ave, Albany
Saturday, Sept 19:
        9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Iroquois beadwork demonstrations, workshop, displays, sales, lectures, competitions, lunch
        6:00-9:00 p.m. Banquet featuring presentation by George Hamell who has curated early beadwork at both
        the New York State Museum and the Rochester Museum and Science Center
Sunday, Sept 20:
        9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Beadwork workshop

Conference registration which covers all the above:$100.00.
Details and registration form at www.otsiningo.com/2015IIBC/2015-IIBC-Home.html
For more information, email isa1@otsiningo.com, 607-729-0016
The International Iroquois Beadwork Conference, founded in 2009, attracts both collectors and researchers of traditional raised beadwork and contemporary Iroquois beadworkers. This year features a Friday afternoon examination of the earliest Iroquois beadwork that was purchased for the first New York State Museum in the 1840s. Additional early 19th-century Iroquois beadwork will be displayed Saturday in the hotel meeting rooms. A weekend workshop for creating a reproduction of the early 19th-century pincushion form will be taught by KarenLyne Hill (Onondaga.) Participants are expected from all of the Iroquois reservations and reserves in New York, Wisconsin, Ontario, and Quebec, as well as from other areas. In the past the IIBC has been held at the Rockwell Museum, The Seneca Iroquois National Museum. Colgate University, Iroquois Indian Museum, Tyendinaga Mohawk Reserve, and the Six Nations Politechnic.

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September 24-27, 2015
ArtsWestchester presents
2015 Jazz Fest
White Plains, NY
Mark your calendars for Jazz Fest 2015. September sizzles with a four-day celebration of jazz in downtown White Plains beginning Thursday, September 24th culminating in an outdoor Jazz & Food Festival on Mamaroneck Avenue with delicious food from area restaurants on Sunday, September 27th.Jazz Fest 2015 is presented in partnership by ArtsWestchester, The City of White Plains and the White Plains Business Improvement District.

THURSDAY, SEPT 24: South American Jazz Project in Concert
8:00 p.m. | ArtsWestchester, 31 Mamaroneck Ave., White Plains, NY
Admission: $20
Enjoy an international ensemble of musicians performing compositions that blend South American rhythms and melodies with Jazz arrangements and improvisation. Led by Grammy award winning pianist, composer, arranger and producer from Buenos Aires, Argentina, and longtime resident of Westchester County, Daniel Freiberg explores music with roots in Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil, Paraguay, Chile and Perú from a Jazz point of view.

FRIDAY, SEPT 25:
Westchester Music Conservatory Jazz Faculty in Concert
12:10 p.m. | Downtown Music at Grace Church, Main Street, White Plains, NY
Free Admission
Featuring Guitarist Greg Diamond, performing classics and original compositions of Latin Jazz.
Women of Piedmont Blues
8:00 p.m.| ArtsWestchester, 31 Mamaroneck Ave., White Plains, NY
Admission: $20
Featuring Poet Gold, Eleanor Ellis, Valerie Turner, Resa Gibbs and Jackie Merritt. A memorable evening that unites some of the key practitioners of the acoustic blues on the East Coast. Presented by the ArtsW Folk Arts Program in cooperation with thecountryblues.com.

SATURDAY, SEPT 26:
Latin Jazz Workshop at the Music Conservatory of Westchester
2:00 to 4:00 p.m.| 216 Central Ave., White Plains, NY 10606, 914-761-3900
Free Admission
An introduction to the unique and exciting Latin Jazz genre. Learn about Latin Jazz concepts and instruments – clave, montuno, tumbao – and the music of its masters like Toto Puente, Cal Tjader and Hilton Ruiz.
The White Plains Library Poetry Slam Presents – an Afternoon of Performance Poetry featuring the Duende Project
3:00 p.m.| At the auditorium of the White Plans Library, 100 Martine Avenue, White Plains, NY
Free Admission
The Duende Project (formerly “Duende”) is the poetry and music project of Tony Brown, veteran performance poet; Steve Lanning-Cafaro, AKA Faro electric bass and Nylon string guitar; Chris Lawton on electric guitar and Chris O’Donnell, drums. They have released 5 CD/chapbook sets, Jim’s Fall, americanized, The Duende Project, One Thing That Scares You, and most recently Basement Takes on their own Loyal Weasel Productions; The Duende Project performs in the New England and Eastern Seaboard regions regularly. Program in cooperation with Zork’s White Plains Library Slam.
Brazil Meets Jazz
8:00 p.m. | White Plains Performing Arts Center, 11 City Place, White Plains, NY
Admission: $35/$25, (Advance discount: $5 off)
With Grammy-nominated Brazilian Trio featuring Helio Alves, piano, Nilson Matta, bass and Duduka Da Fonseca, drums, with Maucha Adnet, vocals, and Mark Morganelli, flugelhorn. Presented in association with the White Plains Performing Arts Center.

SUNDAY, SEPT 27: White Plains Jazz & Food Festival
Noon to 5:00 p.m.| Mamaroneck Avenue Stage, Mamaroneck Avenue, between Martine Avenue and Main Street
Free Admission
♦ Orange Julius and the Big Beat – 16 year old White Plains prodigy on the drums and piano leads a six piece hard-hitting ensemble.
♦ Doug Munro and Big Boss Bossa Nova with Charlie Lagond – The multi-genre guitar virtuoso’s exploration of the Brazilian bossa nova style.
♦ Rocky Middleton Quintet.
♦Sherry Winston – the master of the electric flute explores the sounds of smooth jazz
♦ John Patitucci Quartet with Tim Armacost (sax) and Jay Azzolina (guitar) – Grammy Award winning bassist leads an all-star ensemble from the Rivertowns with international acclaim.

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) announces
CALL FOR PAPERS
The Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) invites abstracts (sessions, papers and posters) for the
Program of the 76th Annual Meeting
Vancouver, BC, March 29–April 2, 2016

The theme of the Program is “Intersections.”
One of the great strengths of anthropology and related applied social sciences is our commitment to strategic engagement with other domains of knowledge creation and applications. It is through such commitments that we appreciate the complexity of human problem solving. It is through the collaborations that inevitably result from the intersections of our work that we seek both insight and social justice. Intersecting is the quintessential process of applied and engaged social inquiry. As a theme for the 2016 annual meeting, the organizers envision an opportunity to acknowledge the intersections that arise from our interactions with people, places, issues, policies, and concepts. See more here about the theme here.

The Society is a multi-disciplinary association that focuses on problem definition and resolution. We welcome papers from all disciplines. We welcome papers from all disciplines.

Abstract Submission Deadline October 15, 2015

Please contact us with any questions:
Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA)
P.O. Box 2436
Oklahoma City, OK 73101-2436
Phone: (405) 843-5113
Fax: (405) 843-8553
Email: info@sfaa.net


Staten Island Arts (SfAA) announces
Staten Island Arts Pop-up Markets

Staten Island Arts will be holding regular pop-up markets that will take place on Thursdays and Fridays, coinciding with exhibits and special holidays, beginning Summer 2015. JULY IS ALMOST FULL!

Artists and vendors interested in showcasing their work at these events can sign up here.

July 9 and 10, 2015 (Summer Market)
Oct. 8 and 9, 2015 (Fall Holiday Market)
Dec .10 and 11, 2015 (Holiday Market)
Feb. 11 and 12, 2016 (Winter Market)
Apr. 21 and 22, 2016 (Spring Market)


Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor announces
Canal Stories, Artifacts, and Images Wanted

The New York State Museum is preparing for a new exhibit on the Erie Canal to open in 2017. New York’s Erie Canal: Gateway to the Nation will highlight those visionaries, engineers, financiers, and laborers who built the canal and people from every walk of life who came in its wake. The exhibition will culminate in an exploration of the people who live near, work by, and enjoy the canal as a unique heritage corridor today.

To submit a story, object, or photograph for consideration, please contact Brad Utter, Senior Historian and Curator by July 1, 2016 at (518) 474-0028 or brad.utter@nysed.gov.


ONGOING EXHIBITIONS AND PRODUCTIONS
The New York State Museum, in collaboration with the Shaker Museum in Mount Lebanon, Hancock Shaker Village, and the Shaker Heritage Society (Albany), as well as the State Library and State Archives, present the exhibition
The Shakers: America’ Quiet Revolutionaries
Museum Open Tuesday-Sunday: 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
New York State Museum, Cultural Education Center, 260 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12230
Admission: The NYS Museum is free. Donations are accepted at the door
The exhibition details one of the most significant and influential communal religious groups in American History. Artifacts from these preeminent Shaker collections will be exhibited together for the first time at the New York State Museum in November 2014. The Shakers launched a revolution parallel to the American Colonies’ struggle against British rule. As they sought religious freedom in America, their spiritual practices and community focus set them apart from greater society. Their devotional routines as well as their product innovations, marketing acumen and views towards gender equality seemed “revolutionary” to the outside world. Thematically divided into six areas, the exhibit will show how the Shakers’ unique model of an equal society challenged the norms of the new nation.

November 15, 2014 — March 6, 2016

Museum of the City of New York (MCNY) presents the exhibition
SAVING PLACE
Fifty Years of New York City Landmarks

10:00 a.m.-6 p.m.
Museum of City of New York, 1220 Fifth Avenue (at 103rd Street), New York, NY 10029
Suggested Admission: Adults: $14 Seniors, students: $10 (with ID); Self-guided student groups: $3/person; Ages 19 and under: Free; Members: Free
The Museum of the City of New York presents SAVING PLACE: 50 Years of New York City Landmarks, a comprehensive exhibition exploring the roots and impact of a landmark preservation movement that has transformed the City and been an engine of New York’s growth and success. Many believe New York’ pioneering Landmarks Law, enacted in April 1965, was the key factor in the rebirth of New York in the final quarter of the 20th century. It fostered pride in neighborhoods and resulted in neighborhood preservation in every borough, connecting and motivating residents and bringing new economic life to older communities. It ensured that huge swaths of the city remain a rich complex of new and old. It also ensured the creative re-use of countless buildings. At the same time, a new body of important architecture has emerged as architects, clients, and the Landmarks Preservation Commission devised innovative solutions for the renovation of landmark buildings and for new buildings in historic districts. The law spawned creativity in architects’ responses to building preservation that has enhanced the cityscape in all five boroughs. Through original documents, drawings, paintings, photographs, building pieces, and more, the exhibition surveys how the landmarks movement developed in New York, going back to early preservation efforts in the beginning of the 20th century. At large tables in the center of the exhibition gallery, visitors will see models and building samples showing the restoration of landmarks all over the city, the creation of new architecture in historic districts, and the addition of new buildings atop or next to landmarks. Examples include models of Diane von Furstenberg’s offices in the Meatpacking District and Norman Foster’s glass skyscraper atop the Art Deco Hearst Building. Also included in the exhibition are architectural fragments from the destroyed Pennsylvania Station and other buildings, maps, infographics, and interactive opportunities to explore landmarks in the city. Saving Place is curated by Donald Albrecht, the Museum’s Curator for Architecture and Design, and Andrew S. Dolkart, the Director of the Historic Preservation Program at Columbia University, with consulting curator Seri Worden, formerly Director of the James Marston Fitch Charitable Foundation.
The Museum will offer an ambitious menu of public programs in conjunction with the exhibition, ranging from a symposium on April 20, to discussions, to lectures, to walking tours. The Museum’s Frederick A.O. Schwarz Children’s Center has designed special programs for students and teachers. Visit the website for more details on upcoming programs.


April 21 —September 13, 2015

City Lore presents
EXHIBITION: Priya’s Shakti

OPENING RECEPTION: Thursday, May 7, 7:30-9:30 p.m.
City Lore Gallery 56 East First Street, New York, NY 10003
Gallery Hours: Wed-Fri 2-6 p.m. and Sat-Sun 12-6 p.m.
Admission is free
RSVP online
n our newest exhibit, Priya’s Shakti, ancient mythologies and the newest technologies are brought together in an augmented reality comic book designed to change attitudes about gender-based violence in India and around the world. Priya’s Shakti arose in the aftermath of a highly-publicized gang rape on a bus in New Delhi in December 2012 that outraged India and the world. Drawing on Hindu mythological figures, the comic book storyline focuses on Priya, a woman and ardent devotee of the Goddess Parvati, who has experienced a brutal rape along with the resulting social stigma and isolation. The entire gallery is turned into an interactive comic book with video installations and stories from Indian folklore to tell her story. Each part of the exhibit offers an augmented reality experience. Visitors are invited to scan the artwork throughout the gallery with the popular augmented reality app, Blippar, to see the comic book come to life.

May 7, 2015 — November 30, 2015

The Museum of the City of New York presents
Folk City: New York and the Folk Music Revival at the Museum of the City of New York
Open daily 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Museum of the City of New York, 1220 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029, 212.534.1672
Discover New York as the Center of the Folk Music Renaissance
Honorary co-chairs: Oscar Brand, Judy Collins, Steve Earle, Nora Guthrie, Noel Stookey and Peter Yarrow
The Museum of the City of New York presents Folk City: New York and the Folk Music Revival, a celebration of the City’s role as the center of the folk music revival from its beginnings in the 1930s and 1940s to its heyday in the 1950s and 1960s, as well as its continuing legacy. With a wide array of memorabilia, including photos, video and sound recordings, the exhibition documents the music and movement that helped transform Greenwich Village and spread as a major cultural phenomenon.
“New York, which has been the source of so much creativity throughout its history, was central to the folk music revival that swept the country and became one of the remarkable phenemona of the 20th Century,” said Susan Henshaw Jones, Ronay Menschel Director of the Museum of the City of New York. “Folk music spawned a whole culture, and the legacy continues today in New York and far beyond. This exhibition and our related public programs explore the revival and will let visitors experience it in a fascinating and joyous way.”
Folk City will feature listening stations where visitors can hear a range of folk songs along with videos showcasing historic footage that capture the bohemian spirit of Greenwich Village in the 1950s and the national hootenanny craze of the 1960s. The exhibition also includes showcases rare archival photographs, concert posters and original instruments, including:
*Lead Belly’s 12-string guitar Odetta’s iconic guitar “Baby” along with one of her colorful kaftan dresses
The original handwritten manuscript of Bob Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the Wind”
The napkin on which Eric Andersen wrote his “Thirsty Boots” lyrics
A trademark felt cap worn by Phil Ochs
Handwritten letters by Woody Guthrie and Peter Seeger, and more


Curated by Stephen Petrus, an Andrew W. Mellon post-doctoral fellow at the Museum, Folk City will look at the folk movement in four sections:
♦ The revival’s roots in the 1930s and 1940s, when singers—such as Woody Guthrie, Josh White, and Burl Ives—moved to New York, drawn by performance opportunities and the progressive political climate.
♦ The expansion of folk music culture in the 1950s, when the genre changed from an art form associated with leftist politics during the Red Scare—ensnaring many performers including Seeger—to a popular craze with mass appeal.
♦ The boom years in the late 1950s to the mid-1960s, when Greenwich Village was the focal point of the revival and culture due to the concentration of performance venues, including the exhibition’s eponymous Folk City.
♦ The legacy of the revival from 1965 to the present day, showing how the revival has continued and retained its relevancy through five decades. This includes the rise of ‘folk-rock’ and other folk trends after the ‘British Invasion’ and Dylan’s stunning turn to electric guitar in 1965. Folk City highlights visionary entrepreneurs who were committed to promoting folk music, including Mike Porco of Gerde’s Folk City, Izzy Young of the Folklore Center, and John Hammond of Columbia Records. The Greenwich Village performance spaces are shown as exciting venues and as incubators of a burgeoning counterculture. Artists from different backgrounds performed in Village clubs as well as in one of the city’s great communal gathering places, Washington Square Park, where they tried out both new music and new ideas that often challenged social conventions of the time. The Museum will offer a broad array of public programs in conjunction with the exhibition, including folk concerts and panel discussions. The Museum’s Frederick A.O. Schwarz Children’s Center has designed special programs for students and teachers, which have been made possible by a grant from the D’Addario Foundation.
The exhibition’s accompanying book, Folk City: New York and the American Folk Music Revival, by Stephen Petrus and historian Ronald D. Cohen, with a foreword by Peter Yarrow. Published by Oxford University Press, the book shows that folk music flowered in New York as a result of initiatives of musicians, record company producers and executives, radio show hosts, club owners, concert promoters, folklorists, managers, journalists, and audiences. Princeton University historian Sean Wilentz calls Folk City “the best history yet of the city’s influential folk music culture, packed with astonishing photos that finally see the light of day.”


June 17, 2015 — November 29, 2015

Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art presents the
THE STORIES WE TELL: HUDSON VALLEY ARTISTS 2015
Curated by Mary-Kay Lombino
Opening reception: Saturday,June 20, 2015, 5-7 p.m.
Artist talk: Saturday, September 26, 2 p.m.
Hours: Wednesday-Sunday: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Alice and Horace Chandler and North Galleries, Samuel Dorsksy Museum of Art, State University of New York, 1 Hawk Drive, New Paltz, NY 12561, 845.257.3844
Suggested Donation: $5
The Hudson Valley has become known not only for its rich visual art but also for its strength in the literary arts. The region is steeped in its own narrative tales such as Washington Irving’s “Rip Van Winkle” and “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,” T.C. Boyle’s novel World’s End, and factual accounts of Henry Hudson’s voyage. The Stories We Tell provides a rare opportunity to examine the ways in which art and literature are closely related—both reflecting artistic practices of today as well as the role of the narrative structure in contemporary art. For Hudson Valley Artists 2015, artists are invited to submit work that considers the following questions. What is the difference between illustration and art that is shaped by narrative structure? How much is narrative a conscious or unconscious factor in an artist’s practice? How do stories factor into abstract art in which the narrative might be known only by the artist? The Stories We Tell: Hudson Valley Artists 2015 focuses on the narrative form of contemporary art and examines how stories shape our experience and our understanding of the world. Instinctively, we are all storytellers merging fiction with non-fiction and conflating the real with the imagined. Included artists: Sean Bayliss, Allen Bryan, Dina Bursztyn, Maureen Cummins, Tasha Depp, Marcia Due, Richard Edelman, Ben Fishman, Kevin Frank, Derek James, Tana Kellner, Virginia Lavado, Deb Lucke, Kathleen MacKenzie, Nestor Madalengoitia, Norman Magnusson, Matthew Maley, Perry Meigs, Phyllis Gay Palmer, Michael Rose, Phil Sigunick, Ken Tannenbaum, Jean Tansey, Jerry Thompson, Karen Whitman, and Tona Wilson.

June 20, 2015 —November 8, 2015

...and beyond
Ward Museum at Salisbury University presents
EXHIBITION: The Art of Sporting and Playing
Opening Reception May 16 during the Ward Museum̱s Festival of Delmarvalous Traditions
Ward Museum 909 South Schumaker Drive, Salisbury, Maryland 21804
Gallery Hours: Monday - Saturday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Sunday: Noon - 5 p.m.
The Delmarva Peninsula has been a vacation destination and playground for centuries, with tourists and locals alike drawn to its beaches, carnivals, hunting grounds, birding havens, and other attractions. The Art of Sporting and Playing celebrates those traditions, locations, and communities that make up the fun, high-spirited, and sometimes competitive side of Delmarva. From pony penning to fox hunting, carousel rides to muskrat skinning, this summertime exhibit in the Ward Museum’s LaMay Gallery will explore the art and artifacts that represent the region’s rich traditions of sport and play.

May 15, 2015 — September 20, 2015

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NEW YORK FOLKLORE SOCIETY ♦ 129 Jay Street ♦ Schenectady, NY 12305 ♦ 518.346.7008 ♦ Fax 518.346.6617 ♦ nyfs@nyfolklore.org