NYFS logo    tagline
 making lacepaper flower makingplaying mandolin
 

AROUND THE STATE

Calendar of Events, Announcements,
& Exhibitions
for New York State


ADD YOUR ANNOUNCEMENT HERE

Support the New York Folklore Society

Around the State Calendar
JAN * FEB * MAR * APR * MAY * JUN * JUL * AUG * SEP * OCT * NOV * DEC

nov2015

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30

EVENTS by date & deadlines        • ANNOUNCEMENTS         • ONGOING EXHIBITIONS

ADD YOUR EVENT OR ANNOUNCEMENT HERE

      Return to the top of page



ANNOUNCEMENTS

Staten Island Arts (SfAA) announces
Staten Island Arts Pop-up Markets

Staten Island Arts will be holding regular pop-up markets that will take place on Thursdays and Fridays, coinciding with exhibits and special holidays, beginning Summer 2015. JULY IS ALMOST FULL!

Artists and vendors interested in showcasing their work at these events can sign up here.

July 9 and 10, 2015 (Summer Market)
Oct. 8 and 9, 2015 (Fall Holiday Market)
Dec .10 and 11, 2015 (Holiday Market)
Feb. 11 and 12, 2016 (Winter Market)
Apr. 21 and 22, 2016 (Spring Market)


Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor announces
Canal Stories, Artifacts, and Images Wanted

The New York State Museum is preparing for a new exhibit on the Erie Canal to open in 2017. New York’s Erie Canal: Gateway to the Nation will highlight those visionaries, engineers, financiers, and laborers who built the canal and people from every walk of life who came in its wake. The exhibition will culminate in an exploration of the people who live near, work by, and enjoy the canal as a unique heritage corridor today.

To submit a story, object, or photograph for consideration, please contact Brad Utter, Senior Historian and Curator by July 1, 2016 at (518) 474-0028 or brad.utter@nysed.gov.


ONGOING EXHIBITIONS AND PRODUCTIONS
The New York State Museum, in collaboration with the Shaker Museum in Mount Lebanon, Hancock Shaker Village, and the Shaker Heritage Society (Albany), as well as the State Library and State Archives, present the exhibition
The Shakers: America’ Quiet Revolutionaries
Museum Open Tuesday-Sunday: 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
New York State Museum, Cultural Education Center, 260 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12230
Admission: The NYS Museum is free. Donations are accepted at the door
The exhibition details one of the most significant and influential communal religious groups in American History. Artifacts from these preeminent Shaker collections will be exhibited together for the first time at the New York State Museum in November 2014. The Shakers launched a revolution parallel to the American Colonies’ struggle against British rule. As they sought religious freedom in America, their spiritual practices and community focus set them apart from greater society. Their devotional routines as well as their product innovations, marketing acumen and views towards gender equality seemed “revolutionary” to the outside world. Thematically divided into six areas, the exhibit will show how the Shakers’ unique model of an equal society challenged the norms of the new nation.

November 15, 2014 — March 6, 2016

The Museum of the City of New York presents
Folk City: New York and the Folk Music Revival at the Museum of the City of New York
Open daily 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Museum of the City of New York, 1220 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029, 212.534.1672
Discover New York as the Center of the Folk Music Renaissance
Honorary co-chairs: Oscar Brand, Judy Collins, Steve Earle, Nora Guthrie, Noel Stookey and Peter Yarrow
The Museum of the City of New York presents Folk City: New York and the Folk Music Revival, a celebration of the City’s role as the center of the folk music revival from its beginnings in the 1930s and 1940s to its heyday in the 1950s and 1960s, as well as its continuing legacy. With a wide array of memorabilia, including photos, video and sound recordings, the exhibition documents the music and movement that helped transform Greenwich Village and spread as a major cultural phenomenon.
“New York, which has been the source of so much creativity throughout its history, was central to the folk music revival that swept the country and became one of the remarkable phenemona of the 20th Century,” said Susan Henshaw Jones, Ronay Menschel Director of the Museum of the City of New York. “Folk music spawned a whole culture, and the legacy continues today in New York and far beyond. This exhibition and our related public programs explore the revival and will let visitors experience it in a fascinating and joyous way.”
Folk City will feature listening stations where visitors can hear a range of folk songs along with videos showcasing historic footage that capture the bohemian spirit of Greenwich Village in the 1950s and the national hootenanny craze of the 1960s. The exhibition also includes showcases rare archival photographs, concert posters and original instruments, including:
*Lead Belly’s 12-string guitar Odetta’s iconic guitar “Baby” along with one of her colorful kaftan dresses
The original handwritten manuscript of Bob Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the Wind”
The napkin on which Eric Andersen wrote his “Thirsty Boots” lyrics
A trademark felt cap worn by Phil Ochs
Handwritten letters by Woody Guthrie and Peter Seeger, and more


Curated by Stephen Petrus, an Andrew W. Mellon post-doctoral fellow at the Museum, Folk City will look at the folk movement in four sections:
♦ The revival’s roots in the 1930s and 1940s, when singers—such as Woody Guthrie, Josh White, and Burl Ives—moved to New York, drawn by performance opportunities and the progressive political climate.
♦ The expansion of folk music culture in the 1950s, when the genre changed from an art form associated with leftist politics during the Red Scare—ensnaring many performers including Seeger—to a popular craze with mass appeal.
♦ The boom years in the late 1950s to the mid-1960s, when Greenwich Village was the focal point of the revival and culture due to the concentration of performance venues, including the exhibition’s eponymous Folk City.
♦ The legacy of the revival from 1965 to the present day, showing how the revival has continued and retained its relevancy through five decades. This includes the rise of ‘folk-rock’ and other folk trends after the ‘British Invasion’ and Dylan’s stunning turn to electric guitar in 1965. Folk City highlights visionary entrepreneurs who were committed to promoting folk music, including Mike Porco of Gerde’s Folk City, Izzy Young of the Folklore Center, and John Hammond of Columbia Records. The Greenwich Village performance spaces are shown as exciting venues and as incubators of a burgeoning counterculture. Artists from different backgrounds performed in Village clubs as well as in one of the city’s great communal gathering places, Washington Square Park, where they tried out both new music and new ideas that often challenged social conventions of the time. The Museum will offer a broad array of public programs in conjunction with the exhibition, including folk concerts and panel discussions. The Museum’s Frederick A.O. Schwarz Children’s Center has designed special programs for students and teachers, which have been made possible by a grant from the D’Addario Foundation.
The exhibition’s accompanying book, Folk City: New York and the American Folk Music Revival, by Stephen Petrus and historian Ronald D. Cohen, with a foreword by Peter Yarrow. Published by Oxford University Press, the book shows that folk music flowered in New York as a result of initiatives of musicians, record company producers and executives, radio show hosts, club owners, concert promoters, folklorists, managers, journalists, and audiences. Princeton University historian Sean Wilentz calls Folk City “the best history yet of the city’s influential folk music culture, packed with astonishing photos that finally see the light of day.”


June 17, 2015 — November 29, 2015

Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art presents the
THE STORIES WE TELL: HUDSON VALLEY ARTISTS 2015
Curated by Mary-Kay Lombino
Opening reception and Curator’s Talk: Saturday,June 20, 2015, 5-7 p.m.
Artist talk: Saturday, September 26, 2 p.m.
Hours: Wednesday-Sunday: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Alice and Horace Chandler and North Galleries, Samuel Dorsksy Museum of Art, State University of New York, 1 Hawk Drive, New Paltz, NY 12561, 845.257.3844
Suggested Donation: $5
The Hudson Valley has become known not only for its rich visual art but also for its strength in the literary arts. The region is steeped in its own narrative tales such as Washington Irving’s “Rip Van Winkle” and “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,” T.C. Boyle’s novel World’s End, and factual accounts of Henry Hudson’s voyage. The Stories We Tell provides a rare opportunity to examine the ways in which art and literature are closely related—both reflecting artistic practices of today as well as the role of the narrative structure in contemporary art. For Hudson Valley Artists 2015, artists are invited to submit work that considers the following questions. What is the difference between illustration and art that is shaped by narrative structure? How much is narrative a conscious or unconscious factor in an artist’s practice? How do stories factor into abstract art in which the narrative might be known only by the artist? The Stories We Tell: Hudson Valley Artists 2015 focuses on the narrative form of contemporary art and examines how stories shape our experience and our understanding of the world. Instinctively, we are all storytellers merging fiction with non-fiction and conflating the real with the imagined. Included artists: Sean Bayliss, Allen Bryan, Dina Bursztyn, Maureen Cummins, Tasha Depp, Marcia Due, Richard Edelman, Ben Fishman, Kevin Frank, Derek James, Tana Kellner, Virginia Lavado, Deb Lucke, Kathleen MacKenzie, Nestor Madalengoitia, Norman Magnusson, Matthew Maley, Perry Meigs, Phyllis Gay Palmer, Michael Rose, Phil Sigunick, Ken Tannenbaum, Jean Tansey, Jerry Thompson, Karen Whitman, and Tona Wilson.

June 20, 2015 —November 8, 2015

      Return to the top of page


NEW YORK FOLKLORE SOCIETY ♦ 129 Jay Street ♦ Schenectady, NY 12305 ♦ 518.346.7008 ♦ Fax 518.346.6617 ♦ nyfs@nyfolklore.org